Category Archives: Uncategorized

Febuary, febry

‘Last February? Last February? Oh yes, I was here last February.’ He [the janitor]  pronounced it exactly as spelled.’  (p. 236) The passage is from Raymond Chandler‘s novel The Little Sister (1949). When I came across this metalinguistic comment, I was wondering … Continue reading

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Guess what?! You don’t just speak a dialect; you’re also illiterate and uneducated!

And here is Ilse Stolte’s second blogpost, on a topic related to the first one she wrote about: For the course on Non-Standard English and prescriptivism, I spend a great deal of time reading through entries of usage guides in … Continue reading

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Well I never! My … was …

I was reading the UK Autocar this week-end, and came across this: “My ghast is well and truly flabbered.” This stopped me in my tracks on two counts: (i) I could never say it, let alone write it; and (ii) … Continue reading

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Dialects vs. Standard English

And here is Emmy Stevens’s second blog post already! She also invites you to participate in her survey. Please do so: your input will be very useful for the paper she is writing for the course. When Huckleberry Finn “snuck” … Continue reading

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On the front page no less

Most of the usage problems studied by Mittins et al. in the late 1960s (Attitudes to English Usage, 1970) have since increased in acceptability. This is what we tested by repeating their survey in the form of usage polls on this … Continue reading

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Etiquette in the 21st century …

Good to know that the etiquette guide is still going strong, and still focusing on women’s social skills: “There is a course on ‘personal and professional impact’ for women, which emphasises body language, presentation and effective communication.” You can read … Continue reading

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Language planning in the 21st century

Is this what language planning looks like in the modern world?

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